A Day, a Life: When a Medic Was Killed in Gaza, Was It an Accident? – The New York Times

To the Palestinians, she was an innocent martyr killed in cold blood, an example of Israel’s disregard for Palestinian life. To the Israelis, she was part of a violent protest aimed at destroying their country, to which lethal force is a legitimate response as a last resort.

…The Palestinians trying to tear down the fence are risking their lives to make a point, knowing that the protests amount to little more than a public relations stunt for Hamas, the militant movement that rules Gaza. And Israel, the far stronger party, continues to focus on containment rather than finding a solution.

In life, Ms. Najjar was a natural leader whose uncommon bravery struck some peers as foolhardy. She was a capable young medic, but one who was largely self-taught and lied about her lack of education. She was a feminist, by Gaza standards, shattering traditional gender rules, but also a daughter who doted on her father, was particular about her appearance and was slowly assembling a trousseau. She inspired others with her outward jauntiness, while privately she was consumed with dread in her final days.

The bullet that killed her, The Times found, was fired by an Israeli sniper into a crowd that included white-coated medics in plain view. A detailed reconstruction, stitched together from hundreds of crowd-sourced videos and photographs, shows that neither the medics nor anyone around them posed any apparent threat of violence to Israeli personnel. Though Israel later admitted her killing was unintentional, the shooting appears to have been reckless at best, and possibly a war crime, for which no one has yet been punished.

A Day, a Life: When a Medic Was Killed in Gaza, Was It an Accident? – The New York Times

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Sudan worshippers turn on imam over protests against President Bashir

Demonstrations began on 19 December after the government announced price rises for fuel and bread.

The protests have escalated into broader calls for an end to the rule of President Bashir, who came to power after a coup in 1989. Activists accuse him of mismanaging the economy.

Over the past year, the cost of some goods has more than doubled, while the Sudanese pound has plunged in value.

…Its economy has also been strained by over 20 years of US sanctions, which were lifted in October 2017. 

…Mr Bashir’s regime has been accused of widespread human rights abuses.

In 2009 and 2010, the International Criminal Court (ICC) charged him with several counts of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity, and a warrant was issued for his arrest.

Sudan worshippers turn on imam over protests against President Bashir – BBC News

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