Babies now allowed on Senate floor after rare rule change

n a rare move, the Senate on Wednesday night voted to change longstanding rules to allow newborns — for the first time — onto the Senate floor during votes.

The rule change, voted through by unanimous consent, was done to accommodate senators with newborn babies, allowing them now to be able to bring a child under 1 year old onto the Senate floor and breastfeed them during votes.

Babies now allowed on Senate floor after rare rule change – CNNPolitics

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How the hell is Eric Greitens still the governor of Missouri?

Five days ago, a Missouri state House committee released a troubling report detailing allegations made by a woman that the state’s Republican governor, Eric Greitens, had subjected her to non-consensual sex and violence.

…On Tuesday afternoon, Greitens’ outlook darkened even more with the announcement by Hawley that the governor could be charged with a felony for illegally obtaining a fundraising list from a non-profit group he started.

How the hell is Eric Greitens still the governor of Missouri? – CNNPolitics

Solid fucking question but do we really not know the answer? Really?

Rebecca Solnit: if I were a man | Life and style | The Guardian

Having strong opinions and clear ideas is incompatible with being flatteringly deferential.

…What is confidence in a man is too often viewed as competitiveness in a woman; what is leadership in a man is bossiness in a woman; even the word bossy, like slut or nag, is seldom applied to men.

…As a girl, I would have liked to have my intelligence and intellectual labours regarded as an unmitigated good and a source of pride, rather than something I had to handle delicately, lest I upset or offend. Success can contain implicit failure for straight women, who are supposed to succeed as women by making men feel godlike in their might.

…I have met a lot of brilliant men whose spouses serve their careers and live in their shadows, and marrying a successful man is still considered the pinnacle of women’s achievement in many circles. Some of those women flourished, but not a few seemed diminished by their role as helpmeet and handmaiden, and if they got divorced, they divorced the identity they’d helped build and maintain. There have been so many women who stayed at home and raised the kids while men went off on adventures and pursued accomplishments. There still are. These straight men with brilliant careers and families – no one asks them how they manage to have it all, because we know: she’s how.

…It’s as though everything fathers do, economics aside, is bonus; nothing mothers do is enough. This is one of the reasons why a woman might want to be a man (and why choosing to have children can mean something entirely different for a woman than a man, unless she has that still-rare thing: a partner whose commitment to the work is truly equal). Were I a man, or had I a woman as partner, I might have made very different choices about marriage and children.

…One often hears statements implying that it’s generous of a man to put up with a woman’s brilliance or success.

…I’ve written before about men explaining things – about that dynamic in which some men assume they know when they don’t, and that the woman they’re talking to doesn’t when she does.

…The word mansplaining now exists in more than 30 languages, according to an article this year, and I realise that built into the idea is a dynamic in which women are eternally the audience. ….An acquaintance recently told me, “A man once asked me if I knew of the Bracero program [for Mexican farmworkers in the US], and when I said, ‘Why yes, I wrote my undergrad thesis about it,’ he replied, ‘Well, I’ll tell you about it.’ I said, ‘No, I’ll tell you, fucker!’ And then the dinner party got weird.”

… I’ve had complete strangers come up to me to unload their theories or stories at considerable length, without reciprocity in the conversation, if conversation is the term for this one-way street. We know the reality of this from studies about how boys are called on more in school, and grow up to talk more in meetings, and interrupt women more than men.

…The phrases sometimes used for men who partner with successful women – taking it in his stride, not put out by, OK with, dealing with, cool with – are reminders that female success can be regarded as some kind of intrusion or inappropriate behaviour.
What would it feel like to have a success that does not in any way contain failure, that is not awkward or grounds for apology, something that you don’t need to downplay, to have power that enhances rather than detracts from your attractiveness? …How do you think big when you’re supposed to not get in the way, not overstep your welcome, not overshadow or intimidate?
Rebecca Solnit: if I were a man | Life and style | The Guardian

hmmmm

Seoulbeats – Irene’s Crime: Reading?

It is a book with themes of marginalization, internalized misogyny, and gender based discrimination. Male fans of Irene took this as a personal attack.

…Irene’s angry male fans have been leaving comments like, “I’m disappointed in her”, “I regret ever thinking of marrying you”, and “Don’t be so naïve to the world. She needs to realize that the majority of her fans are male and it’s wrong for her to make them feel bad when they’re spending money on her”.

…Not unlike many other modern societies, the true heart of feminism is lost through the representation by more radical feminists, who dominate the gender equality conversation.

This may be the case with South Korea: with some of the public’s understanding of feminism being misandry as opposed to equality, feminism has become equated with man-hating.

… When female idols associate with feminism, the problem isn’t that it is seen as an act of man-hating. The real problem is that female K-pop idols associate with feminism, it directly undermines the system of objectification and fantasy that toxic fans construct around female idols. The K-pop industry markets their idols with the perfect boyfriend or girlfriend fantasy.

…A person with autonomy cannot be a fantasy, because a person isn’t a fantasy. Irene, in an offhanded comment, reminded her fans that she is more than just her K-pop persona, and that was her gravest crime in the eyes of toxic fans.

Irene’s Crime: Reading? – seoulbeats

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A Hit Man Came to Kill Susan Kuhnhausen. She Survived. He Didn’t.

Ten years after the attack, Susan finds comfort in helping others to understand that they, too, can survive a near fatal attack. “If you can’t run and you can’t hide, you have to fight,” she says. “You don’t know that you won’t survive.”

…”They’re not calling you a hero because you killed a man,” her boss told her. “They’re calling you a hero because they want to believe, given the same circumstances, they, too, might survive.”

A Hit Man Came to Kill Susan Kuhnhausen. She Survived. He Didn’t. – Willamette Week

huh

What It’s Like to Be a Woman in the Academy – The Chronicle of Higher Education

I was 22, fresh from undergrad, and, as a child of the “girl power” 1990s, entirely unused to the idea that anyone would take me less seriously simply because I was not a man. I soon learned that being taken seriously depended on style and self-presentation as much as on intelligence and insight.

The male graduate students in my cohort displayed their academic seriousness with an ease that I found impossible to imitate. They knew how to dress for class (blazer, oxfords, a touch of tweed); how to speak forcefully in seminar, without making apologies or soliciting approval*; how to shake hands with male faculty members in a way that was both chummy and professional.

…”Women are welcome,” announced the male graduate student who directed the Hegel reading group, as if women needed his permission** to think dialectically.

…Anxious and confused about how to establish a suitable academic self, I spent my first few years of graduate school vacillating between girlishness and a kind of steely professionalism. I started wearing dresses, then chopped off all my hair. I spoke with ingratiating, self-effacing “uptalk” one day, and was entirely too strident the next.

As the years went by, and I advanced toward the Ph.D., the rules for women became more numerous, and the box for acceptable behavior grew smaller still. Do be an approachable teacher, but don’t be too friendly with your students, or they’ll take advantage of you. Don’t wear a dress to your MLA interview; you’ll be in a hotel room, possibly proximate to a bed, and men won’t be able to stop themselves from sexualizing you. At your job talk, be sure to say “thank you” after each question; men shouldn’t do this — they would appear obsequious — but women must (or so a female faculty member advised me). Be extremely careful when speaking about partners and families, or you might not get the job.

…Hierarchies — of gender, race, and class — are established and reinforced through hirings and firings, handshakes and outfits.

What It’s Like to Be a Woman in the Academy – The Chronicle of Higher Education

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* – one be inclined to add, without fear of their confidence being interpreted as being over-the-top, bitchy, unfounded, or inappropriately aggressive, and giving rise to reactions like, “Who do he think he is?”

** – (or encouragement and support)