Hong Kong protests: Police fire tear gas at activists

Beijing and the Chinese army have issued stern warnings about the unrest.

Two months of demonstrations sparked by a controversial extradition bill show no signs of abating, with both sides hardening their stance.

Although the government has now suspended the bill, which would have allowed extraditions to mainland China, demonstrators want the bill fully withdrawn.

Their demands have broadened to include calls for more democracy and for Hong Kong’s leader Carrie Lam to resign.

…Saturday’s march comes after a group of civil servants – ordered to be politically neutral – joined demonstrations in their thousands on Friday.

The rally followed the publication of an anonymous letter on Facebook complaining about “extreme oppression” and listing five key demands – the complete withdrawal of the extradition bill; waiving charges against those arrested; an end to descriptions of protests as “rioting”; an independent inquiry into the unrest; and resuming political reforms.

…More than 40 activists appeared in court on Wednesday, charged with rioting after protests last Sunday turned violent.

They could face up to 10 years behind bars if convicted.

Tensions rose further when the military – which has not yet intervened in the unrest – posted a video on social media network Weibo showing soldiers conducting anti-riot drills.

Hong Kong protests: Police fire tear gas at activists – BBC News

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Why some countries are shipping back plastic waste

Many wealthy countries send their recyclable waste overseas because it’s cheap, helps meet recycling targets and reduces domestic landfill.

For developing countries taking in the rubbish, it’s a valuable source of income.

But contaminated plastic and rubbish that cannot be recycled often gets mixed in.

…Only a tiny fraction of all plastics ever produced has been recycled.

Often, materials that can’t be recycled end up being burned illegally, dumped in landfills or waterways, creating risks to the environment and public health.

 ….Until January 2018, China imported most of the world’s plastic waste.

But due to concerns about contamination and pollution, it declared it would no longer buy recycled plastic scrap that was not 99.5% pure.

…Malaysia, Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, Taiwan, South Korea, Turkey, India and Poland all took up the slack.

…But the rubbish arriving in these countries wasn’t sufficiently recyclable, and it has caused problems.

…”What the citizens of the UK believe they send for recycling is actually dumped in our country,” said Malaysian Minister Yeo Bee Yin.

…However, there is still an overwhelming demand for locations to send plastic and other waste to for recycling, and the challenge of how to dispose of it remains.

…In 2016, 235 million tonnes of plastic waste was generated globally.

On current trends, this could reach 417 million tonnes per year by 2030.

Why some countries are shipping back plastic waste – BBC News

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Japanese Tanker Owner Says U.S. Is Wrong About Gulf Attack

Yutaka Katada, the owner of one of the stricken fuel tankers crippled in explosions in the Gulf of Oman on Thursday, says the U.S. is wrong about the way the attack was carried out.

…“It seems there was a high chance they were attacked by a flying object. The impact was well above the water. I don’t think it was a torpedo.”

Japanese Tanker Owner Says U.S. Is Wrong About Gulf Attack

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