Six Atlanta Police officers being charged after allegedly using excessive force at protest

The officers were filmed in downtown Atlanta breaking windows of a vehicle, yanking a woman out of the car and tasing a man. The two victims were later identified as college students at Spelman and Morehouse, both historically black schools, and were returning from protests calling for an end to police violence against black citizens.

…Arrest warrants have been issued for Lonnie Hood, Willie Sauls, Ivory Streeter, Mark Gardner, Armond Jones and Roland Claud. Some of the charges against the officers include aggravated assault of Messiah Young, aggravated assault of Taniyah Pilgrim, simple battery and criminal damage to property, Howard said.

Two of the six officers, Streeter and Gardner, were terminated Sunday by Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms.

Six Atlanta Police officers being charged after allegedly using excessive force at protest – CNN

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Black flight attendant unknowingly has emotional discussion on race with white airline CEO – ABC News

Hill recalled him telling her he was halfway through it, but that it “really point[ed] out how important these conversations on race are.”

“As I began to respond the tears just start[ed] falling,” Hill said.

Parker later told American Airlines executives in an email that he “felt wholly inadequate” but “knew it was a special moment.”

…When Parker disembarked from the plane, he handed Hill a handwritten note telling her that she could email him if she wanted to continue their conversation.

“I am saddened that we as a society have progressed so slowly on an issue that has such a clear right versus wrong,” Parker wrote to Hill. “Much of the problem is we don’t talk about it enough.”

Parker also emailed Hill’s mother, Patti, telling her that her daughter’s visit was a “gift.”

Hill posted about the encounter on her Facebook, and in a little over three days, it has garnered over 6,000 reactions.

“We are not so different in what we want out of life,” Hill told ABC News. “All we both wanted in that moment was peace and to be understood.”

Black flight attendant unknowingly has emotional discussion on race with white airline CEO – ABC News

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Police union account temporarily suspended after tweeting de Blasio’s daughter’s arrest | TheHill

Twitter temporarily suspended the account for a union representing sergeants in the New York Police Department on Monday for violating its privacy policy, a spokesperson for the platform confirmed, after the account reportedly shared information about the arrest of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s (D) daughter.

…The internal police report, which is not typically made public by the department, reportedly included Chiara de Blasio’s personal information including height, weight, address, date of birth and driver’s license information.

…In the since-removed post, the union asked how police officers could protect New Yorkers from “rioting anarchists” when “the mayor’s object-throwing daughter is one of them,” according to the Times.

Nothing in the police report suggested Chiara de Blasio had thrown any object, the newspaper added.

Police union account temporarily suspended after tweeting de Blasio’s daughter’s arrest | TheHill

Like the officers composing them, Police unions are not on the side of law and order and they seek to protect the police at the cost of the citizenry.

Also like the officers who compose them, they are not above criminal acts, inciting violence, or threatening innocent people to make themselves feel powerful.

Lizzo and Lil Nas X criticise Blackout Tuesday for obscuring protests

Many of these posts were accompanied with the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter or #blm instead of #BlackoutTuesday, reducing the power of the #BlackLivesMatter hashtag to spread information about the protests and wider justice movement. “Please don’t use the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter because it is flooding the hashtag search,” Minneapolis rapper Lizzo said in an Instagram video.

…The California R&B star Kehlani criticised the potential for #BlackoutTuesday to suppress the sharing of information between protesters. “While I do appreciate the idea … don’t y’all think getting off our form of communicating with each other, sharing info, seeing news … for a whole day … in the middle of a war on us … is kinda dangerous? By all means don’t spend. But we need each other on HERE.” She continued: “Anything could go down wit no ability to warn each other/help each other.”

…The British producer Mura Masa condemned the push for silence, saying: “Inaction is what got us here.” 

….Lizzo encouraged her fans to vote in the US presidential primaries. “There are many ways to protest. Find your voice and use it.”

Lizzo and Lil Nas X criticise Blackout Tuesday for obscuring protests | Lizzo | The Guardian

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George Floyd and Derek Chauvin Might as Well Have Lived on Different Planets

Severe segregation in the Twin Cities region is a relatively recent phenomenon. In the 1960s and 1970s, the Minneapolis region was one of the most racially integrated in the nation. This was partially the product of a carefully designed “fair share” program that required all municipalities within the region to develop affordable housing within their borders, preventing suburbs from effectively barring low-income residents, as had occurred in most major American cities. Minneapolis also operated an aggressive school desegregation plan. But over time, both programs broke down under pressure from special interests and were substituted for by less politically troublesome programs.

This new approach focused more on improving segregated schools than eliminating them, and uplifting impoverished neighborhoods without directly addressing the region’s racialized living patterns. Combined with an increase in the region’s racial diversity, this policy shift caused residential and educational segregation — almost always closely linked — to rapidly spike.

…When police forces live in neighborhoods that are racially and socioeconomically distinct from the areas they serve, the police themselves can start to [act] less like community representatives, and more like an occupying force. A police officer who lives out of town, interacting with the resident of a poor or segregated neighborhood, is a microcosm of the embedded racial tensions across an entire geographic region.

Opinion | George Floyd and Derek Chauvin Might as Well Have Lived on Different Planets – The New York Times

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Iran tells US to ‘stop violence’ against Americans: ‘Let them breathe’ | TheHill

“To the American people: the world has heard your outcry over the state of oppression. The world is standing with you,” foreign ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi told reporters in Tehran Monday.

…”We deeply regret to see the American people, who peacefully seek respect and no more violence, being suppressed indiscriminately and met with utmost violence,” Mousavi told reporters.

Iran tells US to ‘stop violence’ against Americans: ‘Let them breathe’ | TheHill

Iran even…. How the mighty have fallen.

Rahul Dubey sheltered dozens of protesters in his Washington, DC, home to protect them from arrest

Dubey told CNN affiliate WJLA that he was on his stoop and had let some of the protesters charge their phones inside and use his bathroom before police moved in. “There was a big bang and there was spray that my eyes started burning, screaming like I’ve never heard before, and I’ve described it as a ‘human tsunami’ is the best I could see for about a quarter of a block coming down the street,” he told WJLA.

He said he was yelling “get in, get into the house” for about 10 minutes.
Dubey told WJLA that about 70 protesters got inside and it was “pandemonium and mayhem” for about an hour and a half while they tried to settle in and help people who’d been pepper sprayed.

…He said that at one point Dubey was able to have pizza delivered and some members of the community also brought food.

Becca Thimmesch lives about two blocks away from Dubey and said she and three other people stayed on his stoop overnight to observe the police activity and check in with the protesters.

…”Then around five, with an hour of curfew to go, community members started showing up left and right bringing food and water and hand sanitizer and their cars and offering to take people,” Thimmesch said.

…Thimmesch said she saw several other residents on the street let protesters into their houses.
“There is currently a global pandemic, and we’ve been told, ‘do not let people in your house, do not be sharing space with people,’ ” she said. “And you know, these random people made what is what I consider to be a huge sacrifice, to try and guarantee the safety of young people that they didn’t know.”

Rahul Dubey sheltered dozens of protesters in his Washington, DC, home to protect them from arrest – CNN

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Louisville Police Left David McAtee’s Body on Street for 12 Hours

THE BODY OF David McAtee laid in the streets of Louisville, Kentucky, for over 12 hours on Monday. McAtee had been killed by law enforcement just after midnight on Sunday, May 31, amid days of protests over police violence nationwide. Noon the next day, protesters were gathered at the site. McAtee’s body was still there.

McAtee, the owner of a local barbecue business and a beloved community figure, was shot and killed after Louisville police and the National Guard opened fire on a crowd that had gathered at a parking lot on 26th and Broadway. As the owner of YaYa’s BBQ, McAtee was known to give police officers free meals. Bystanders and witnesses have said that the crowd was not protesting when the police arrived. 

…Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear attributed the killing to the Louisville Metro Police Department and the National Guard. Police officers, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer said, had not activated their body cameras in violation of policy. Police Chief Steve Conrad was fired as a result, but retains his pension.

Louisville Police Left David McAtee’s Body on Street for 12 Hours

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Shaken de Blasio pleads for community help as Cuomo chides NYPD response to protests

“I am disappointed and outraged in what happened in New York City last night,” Cuomo said during a news briefing Tuesday. “The police in New York City were not effective at doing their job last night. Period. They have to do a better job.”

Cuomo has put state police and 13,000 members of the National Guard on standby ….but said the police had the capacity to handle the situation on their own.

De Blasio — at a tense news conference during which he snapped at reporters and called on local leaders to take a more active role in the protests — forcefully denounced the idea of allowing organized troops onto city streets, arguing their presence would only ratchet up tensions and heighten the chaos he is trying to tamp down.

“Someone needs a history lesson: When outside armed forces go into communities, no good comes of it,” he said.

Shaken de Blasio pleads for community help as Cuomo chides NYPD response to protests

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McConnell Scuttles Rebuke of Trump for Breaking Up Protest

Washington is one of dozens of cities where nightly curfews have been enacted to tamp down the back-to-back protests. There was still half an hour to go before curfew on Monday, however, when a group occupying Lafayette Square, a small public park just beyond the northern gates of the White House, were physically dispersed by members of the National Guard, Secret Service and the U.S. Park Police. 

Protesters say they were hit with rubber bullets, flash-bang grenades and tear gas — a chemical weapon banned in warfare.

McConnell Scuttles Rebuke of Trump for Breaking Up Protest

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Police marching with protesters: how some cities got it right and others didn’t | US policing | The Guardian

There are a few policies that Sinyangwe said the evidence supports. There is not enough data, Sinyangwe said, to say that anti-bias training and classes are a solution. Instead, he points to strong restrictions on how police can use force, curbing the military-grade weapons distributed to the police and cracking down on police union contracts. 

There is also an increasingly important conversation about defunding the police, which lawmakers such as Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez have resurfaced this week. The $6bn New York police department, for example, is bigger than the city’s budget for many housing, education and health initiatives.

“Part of police violence is policing of things that shouldn’t be policed,” Sinyangwe said, such as sending police to people having mental health crises. “To do that we have to make a divestment from policing and shift those resources.”

Police marching with protesters: how some cities got it right and others didn’t | US policing | The Guardian

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Minneapolis police rendered 44 people unconscious with neck restraints in five years

Minneapolis police data shows that in the bulk of use-of-force cases involving neck restraints when an individual lost consciousness, the restraint was used after a suspect fled on foot or tensed up as they were being taken into custody. Almost half of the people who lost consciousness were injured, according to the reports, which do not spell out the severity of those injuries.

…In most cases, there was no apparent underlying violent offense.

…The Minnesota police data showed three-fifths of those subjected to neck restraints and then rendered unconscious were black. About 30 percent were white. Two were Native Americans. Almost all are male, and three-quarters were age 40 or under.

One was a 14-year-old in a domestic abuse incident that was in progress when the officer arrived. Another was a 17-year-old fleeing from a shoplifting incident. Another involved a traffic stop where the suspect was deemed “verbally non-compliant.”

…Obayashi said it’s notable that the Minneapolis Police Department policy on neck restraints appears to be dated and said that rather than discouraging or generally prohibiting the tactic, its policy language is consistent with a permissive stance.

…”This seems to be a routine practice by the Minneapolis Police Department,” said Obayashi. “As a cop, the tone is there, ‘Use it when you think it’s appropriate.'”

Minneapolis police rendered 44 people unconscious with neck restraints in five years

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George Floyd protest: 4,400 arrests; DC church on fire; Chicago unrest

George Floyd protest: 4,400 arrests; DC church on fire; Chicago unrest

Jeezus, the footage of multiple cops driving into crowds of protestors and trying to drive OVER them is chilling.  those are the people that are being protested.

And anyone want to bet on whether or not the President left his wife and Barron up in the White House when he fled to his coward’s bunker?